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3 Top Tips for finding Creative Enthusiasm

At the start of the pandemic, there seemed to be no shortage of creative enthusiasm. Remember all the rainbows and banana bread? But now, I just keep hearing the same thing. That passion to be creative we all had has gone. We’ve stopped beginning new projects and ran out of oomph to complete the ones we’d already started. Essentially, we are suffering from pandemic induced creative-block.

But it is hardly surprising. The last year has seen us starved of inspiration. We have been looking at the same four walls, the same computer screens and walking along the same paths for our daily exercise.  

Creativity thrives on new connections, making links between new stuff you see, do and experience with the stuff you have already seen and done. Mix everything up and you create something entirely different. But we haven’t been seeing, doing or experiencing anything new, so we are stuck working with the same old ideas.  

Lockdowns and restrictions have deprived us of fresh inspiration. Without this, our enthusiasm and eagerness to create has been lost. So It’s no wonder we are all feeling like our creative mojo has abandoned us. And we shouldn’t be beating ourselves up about it. There’s been a lot going on, but at the same time,  nothing at all. 

So although I’m giving you a permission slip to go easy on yourself in the creativity department, here are three things you can do (even in a pandemic) to find some of your creative enthusiasm.

Top Tip 1 – Change up your route

Going for a daily walk has been a lifeline to me this last year. I started off going my local park, as I normally would. But I was getting bored of seeing the same things every day. So I branched out to the roads surrounding the park. Then I opened up Google maps and started looking at other routes I could take.

Just being somewhere I haven’t been before, even if it was only 10mins from my house, felt invigorating! If you live in an urban or suburban area, you’ll be surprised at what you can find. I discovered some beautiful houses, a tennis centre and some really cool street art that I didn’t know existed. If you are in a village or rural area, try using Footpaths Map to find public footpaths. Yes, you might find countryside views, but also more unexpected things. Dilapidated old buildings, a horse wearing a zebra coat and even farm vending machines (I found all these things on a walk from my parents house in Derbyshire where I stayed during the 1st lockdown!)

I hope it goes without saying, but I’m going to say it anyway – please consider your own safety when doing this and don’t go anywhere you feel uncomfortable. 

Top Tip 2 – Go on a Photowalk.

A photowalk is just going on a walk with the express intention of finding interesting things to photograph. If you’re thinking there isn’t anything vaguely interesting near you worth taking a picture of, look for the small details. Zoom in on the little things and go more abstract!

Try to spot different textures, or find a specific colour or shapes. It diesn’t matter if you live in a city, town or village, there will always be something to photograph when you look.

You can just use your phone camera, but sometimes it can help to use a proper camera, if you have one.  It gets you into a different state of mind and prevents any phone-based distractions.

Don’t worry about the images you take being “Instagram-worthy”, you don’t have to share them with anyone! But you might just be surprised by the results. 

Top Tip 3 – Learn a new craft skill.

We might not be able to go to craft workshops, but there are lots of ways you can learn something new at home. You can read a blog post, follow a YouTube tutorial or buy a craft kit (such as my macrame kits, hint hint).

If learning a totally new craft seems daunting, go for something that is similar, but different! By this, I mean find some similarity in the tools, techniques or materials used.

So if cross-stitch is your thing, try bead weaving as it also uses a needle and thread so will feel familiar. Love embroidery? How about up scaling and trying punch needle. If you normally do yarn-based crafts like knitting or crochet, try other fibre crafts like macramé or weaving instead!

Obviously, you might fancy going for a radically new craft, in which case, go for it and I applaud your enthusiasm!

These are three things that keep my creativity ticking over, not only throughout this pandemic, but in general. Kick-starting you creative enthusiasm doesn’t have to be some epic undertaking, it can be as simple as going for walk somewhere new.

Beaded Daisy Necklace

Beaded Daisy Necklace

Make a beaded daisy necklace and earrings set using this twist on daisy chain stitch.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

A couple of months ago the lovely Charlotte Jacklin shared a beaded daisy necklace on her Instagram feed. I recognised the pattern as being the classic daisy chain beading stitch, but with a twist. Normally, beaded daisy chain is made with a needle and thread in a continuous stitch. But this necklace had individual beaded daisies made hanging as individual drops! The shop Charlotte bought the necklace no longer sells them, and she mentioned having to get her teenage beading supplies out again!

This is a fairly simple project if you have some basic jewellery making skills. If you are new to beading and jewellery making, or just want a little refresher, sign up to my email list and you will get my Getting Started with Jewellery Making eBook to help you along!

You will need:

Size 8 seed beads. A yellow for the centre of your daisies and as many other colours as you want for the petals! Each individual daisy only needs 1x centre beads and 7x petal beads.

0.3mm/ 28 gauge soft wire. You *might* be able to get away with using a 0.4mm if it is a very soft. 0.2mm will fit through, but is very fine and tricky to work with.

Chainnose pliers, round nose pliers and jewellery cutters

-For the earrings: earring hooks

-For the necklace: chain, clasp and 5mm jump rings.

How to make Beaded Daisies

1.Cut 25cm / 10 inches of 0.3mm wire and thread on 4 x petal beads and 1 x centre bead. Slide the beads along so the petal colour beads are approximately 10cm / 4 inches from the end.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

2.Take the longer end (coming out of the centre colour bead) and thread it back through the 1st petal bead.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

3.Pull tightly to form one half of your daisy.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

4.Working with the long end again, thread on 3 x petal beads.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

5.Take that long end of wire and feed it through the petal bead on the opposite side of the daisy.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

6.Pull tightly, using a pair of plier to help pull the wire through.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

7.Your finished daisy should look like this. We now need to weave the longer piece of wire around to meet the other shorter end.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

8.Feed the wire through the next 3 petal beads, so the wires are both coming out of the same bead. This can be tricky, so I recommend using pliers to help.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

9.To make a loop in the wire, you need to treat these two separate wires as one, so make sure they are pulled together.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

10.Use a pair of round nose pliers to create a wrapped loop. Go to this blog post for more detailed instructions on how to do this is you are new to jewellery making!

11.You now have one complete beaded daisy!

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

To make Beaded Daisy Earrings

  1. Make two beaded daisies and just twist open the loop of your earring findings to add them on!
Beaded Daisy Earrings DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

To make a Beaded Daisy Necklace

1.Make as many beaded daisies as you want on your necklace. odd numbers look best, so 3, 5, 7 or 9 are good options!

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

2.Measure out your chain: for a short necklace cut 40cm/16inches, 45cm/18inches for a slightly longer style. Using jump rings, attach a clasp at one end and add single jump ring to the other.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

3.Find the middle of your necklace and attach one of your daisies to the chain with a jump ring.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

4.Then attach two more daisies either side about 2cm/1 inch apart. The best way to do this is to count the links on your chain. I’m using an extension style chain which has quite large links, so there are only 4 links in between each daisy.

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

5.Repeat this process to add as many daisies as you want!

Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable
Beaded Daisy Necklace DIY Tutorial by Make and Fable

Please share this Beaded Daisy Necklace tutorial if you enjoyed it, and if you have any questions, leave a comment below, come and find me on Instagram or Sign up to my monthly ‘Making, Creating and Little Adventures’ email  where you will also get a copy of my Getting Started in Jewellery Making eBook! Happy Making!

Where to Buy Macrame Supplies

Where to Buy Macrame Supplies

Where to buy macrame supplies in the UK, from rope and cord to beads and findings. This page goes along with my Modern Macrame Jewellery and Accessories book, but is useful for anyone looking for macrame cords, rope and other supplies. More sections will added in time and new suppliers included as I find them, so bookmark the page for future reference.

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Wire Spider Web Necklace DIY

Wire Spider Web Necklace DIY

Whilst I am not the biggest fan of actual spiders, I have to admit that their webs are beautiful, especially when they hang from plants and are decorated with tiny drops of dew! Add this to my campaign to make Halloween crafts that are pretty rather than garish and we have a delicate wire spider web necklace DIY, complete with beaded dew!

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